Old Style Tales, The Yellow Booke V

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

My homage to windswept vilages and ghostly pursuers, The Bridge At Barrowdale, has been published in Old Style Tale’s collection The Yellow Booke V. The collection can be ordered as a hard copy or downloaded as a PDF, and features illustrated stories from Ever Dundas, Thomas Olivieri and M. Grant Kellermeyer amongst others.

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I SPENT A UNSETTLED EVENING, sitting in a wooden chair by the drawing room’s single window and staring out at the phosphorescent sea. The quiet of the cottage, so inviting in the clamour of the City, now seemed haunted by a spectral silence. I lit a small lantern as night fell but the flickering flame jittered queasily against the warped glass of the window and eventually I pinched it out rather than suffer its fevered dancing. No moon rose into the sky but a bright scatter of stars shone their sparse light down to sparkle on the breaking waves. The eerie bark of a family of seals called from somewhere offshore, rising over the susurration of water on stone. Eventually I slept, fitfully, wrapped in coarse blankets and dreaming of sea-cold fingers reaching out of the night.

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Richard Lainhart, White Night

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

Think back, way back, to a snow-filled evening in 1974. Earlier in the year, ABBA won the Eurovision contest and, although Kraftwerk had released the monumental Autobahn, it was still music like Dolly Parton and the nascent Kiss that held centre stage. A young, idealist label by the name of Virgin Records were about to unleash Tangerine Dream’s ambient classic Phaedre onto an unsuspecting (and vaguely stoned) public but not even the likes of Brian Eno had come to fully understand the power and appeal of entirely electronic music.

So, what happened on this snowy evening? Richard Lainhart turned on his equipment and, arguably, recorded one of the first pieces of electronic, drone-based ambient music.

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Trembling With Fear, “Just Like HVN”

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

One of my drabbles, works of fiction that consist of exactly one hundred words, has been published by The Horror Tree’s Trembling With Fear imprint.

She sighed. The voices had been telling her that she needed to leave for days now. She’d procrastinated, but today was it. She’d be sad to leave. She lifted the gun-shaped device to her temple, sighed once again, then pulled the trigger.

Trembling With Fear, “To The Sea, The Sorrow”

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

One of my drabbles, works of fiction that consist of exactly one hundred words, has been published by The Horror Tree’s Trembling With Fear imprint.

“She has gone to the sea,” he’d told his daughter who, old enough, dismissed the words as a well-meaning fable.

The Audient Void #3

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

My short story ‘The Many Roads to Weatherly” has been published in The Audient Void #3, my second story to be published by the journal after ‘The Left Hand of Aux-Çevoires‘.

He presses on as the path swings out to follow the edge of a placid stream, where the current streams green algae out into fans of emerald hair. A grey, dust-stained tree dips its branches into the water, plucking at the surface. The rib-like remains of a canoe pull at the end of a rope, dancing and jerking on the current like a fretful dog.

Once again Allen K provides excellent cover design but my story features a superb illustration from Brad Hicks.

Dead Reckonings #21

September 10, 2017 § Leave a comment

My article on R Muuray Gilchrist, concentrating on the mythic and floral symbolism in his weird short story ‘The Crimson Weaver’, has been published in Hippocampus Press’ Dead Reckonings 21, the Spring 2017 edition.

I couldn’t be more pleased for my piece to be the opening article in this re-imagined version of a classic journal, especially alongside other writing by the likes of Ramsay Campbell and ST Joshi.

“[Gilchrist’s] finest works of what we would now call weird horror – where “suicide, madness, drunkenness, disfigurement, dwarfs, hereditary diseases and strange deaths abound” – sit perfectly between the gloomy corridors of Poe and the awful vistas of Clark Ashton Smith.”

“How Do We Kill It?” – Thoughts on Alien: Covenant

May 18, 2017 § Leave a comment

I preface the following thoughts about Alien: Covenant by saying that I actually quite enjoyed watching it as a piece of entertainment; there’s a lot in it that’s well done, tense and exceptionally gruesome. However, while it could be said to be an average sci-fi film it’s a poor Alien film that plays more as fanfic than a studio blockbuster.

Even the soundtrack, good as it is, is essentially an homage to a better one.

There will be spoilers after the jump.

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